Jelly vs the Brush: A 13-Year Battle

The post Jelly vs the Brush: A 13-Year Battle by Allison Dorsey appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Hi, I’m Allison. Read my introduction to learn more about me and my three mixed-breed dogs from Thailand, Jelly, Lorraina, and Manic.

If you have a dog, you will most likely have to battle with their fur. You will find it on your clothes, on the floor, under the bed…you get the picture. One obvious way to battle the fur is by grooming your dog. Now, if your dog does not mind being brushed, this should be a fairly simple task.

Unless you have a dog like Jelly. What should be a simple grooming session turns into a battle—and Jelly usually wins.

Jelly’s Shedding

Jelly started shedding heavily when she reached middle age. It was not excessive, but I noticed I had to sweep up more fluff a bit more than usual. Worried, I reached out to my vet. After an examination and discussion of her history, the vet did not say her shedding was due to any illness, allergies, stress, or parasites, so I was not concerned with her overall health. We also do not know what breed she is mixed with, so her shedding could be due to genetics. She has a single coat, so the shedding is fairly consistent throughout the year.

However, this means my home started becoming full of fluff fairly consistently.

Jelly getting brushed outside

Jelly History With Brushing

Since she was shedding more frequently, I decided that brushing her a few times a week was necessary to keep the house clean. Plus, it would be more comfortable for her. I doubt she enjoyed being surrounded by her loose fur more than I do.

I have brushed her before and used various types of brushes. However, she never really liked it and always ran away. Jelly has short fur and did not shed much when she was a puppy, so I did not mind skipping her weekly grooming session.

But why did she hate it so much? I never harmed her (to my knowledge) when brushing her. I was gentle and never held her down. I even rewarded her with treats afterward. Plus, puppies are difficult anyway, right? It must be a phase. Surely, now that Jelly is a mature adult dog, she would accept grooming with more grace.

Nope.

How in the World Do I Brush Her?

After doing a “power sweep” of my house and finding fluff under every piece of furniture and in every corner, I decided that I needed to set up a brushing routine. My house was 30% fluff, and while that may not seem that bad, having a third of your living space be full of dog hair is not pleasant.

One afternoon, I grabbed the fine-toothed comb and took Jelly outside. From previous grooming experiences, I learned to brush her away from the front door; otherwise, the wind would blow the fur I tried desperately to remove from Jelly back into the living room.

“Come here, my sweet Jellybean,” I cooed, hoping she would not suspect what was about to happen.

Once in a decent spot away from the door, I knelt down and let her smell the brush. I did that to let her know what was coming. Then, I gently put my hand on her side and started brushing her hind legs and hip area, where I saw little tufts of fur sticking out. After about six seconds, Jelly started to back away, but I had barely begun. I needed at least five minutes to get the loose fur off her.

Jelly does not wear a collar as our property is fenced in, so there was nothing I could gently hold on to in order to keep her close. So, I quickly maneuvered in front of her and continued to brush her legs. Jelly was not having it. She ducked down and scurried a few feet away from me again.

“Jelly, c’mon!” I moaned.

I started walking toward her, but she started trotting away. She whirled around and looked me in the eye as if daring me to try this again. I avoided eye contact with her and pretended to walk past her back toward the house. She started to follow me.

Then I spun around and gently put my arm across her chest so I could get a few more brushes in before she ran off to the other end of the yard.

I aimed to get 15 strokes in. 12…13…14…

Nope. Just one brush shy of 15 strokes, Jelly broke free and took off down the hill. This is where I stopped. She had enough. I looked down at the brush and pulled out the removed fluff. It was practically a handful. If I was actually successful, I could probably have filled a throw pillow with the removed fur.

Jelly's fur!

The Battle Was a Partial Success, But the War Continues

I don’t want to force Jelly to be brushed. I hate that she dislikes it, but my old girl is a shedder. She needs to get brushed for her health and the state of our home. I am thankful my other two dogs like being brushed. Of course, they are not the ones that shed that much.

I figured that if I just gave her a quick brush every day for a few seconds, this would be better than trying to do a full five-minute grooming session. At least I would get some of the stray fluff.

Now, if you will excuse me, I need to sweep my floor for the third time today.

The post Jelly vs the Brush: A 13-Year Battle by Allison Dorsey appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

My Dog Was Stung by a Scorpion, What Should I Do? Vet Approved Advice

While the thought of your dog getting stung by a scorpion is scary, the good news is that scorpion stings are rarely fatal in dogs. Nevertheless, we recommend getting your dog to the vet immediately because of the pain it causes and to reduce the risk of complications. A yelp is likely the first indication your pet has been stung, but other signs include dilated pupils, drooling, and worse case, labored breathing. If you’re concerned about your dog getting stung by a scorpion, keep reading as we go over everything you need to do.

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Here’s What to Do

The best thing you can do if your dog is stung by a scorpion is to call your vet before driving to the clinic so that they’re prepared for you and your pup. Once they know you’re on your way, put your dog in your car and drive them to the vet.

The sting can be quite painful, and there are a couple of things you’ll need to keep in mind:
  • Be mindful that your dog may not want to be touched at the wound site.

  • Try to keep your pooch from licking the area.

  • Apply ice or an ice pack wrapped in a towel to reduce swelling and pain.

woman making notes on smartphone and in notebook
Image Credit: fizkes, Shutterstock

Risks Associated With Scorpion Stings

A variety of clinical signs can be seen in dogs stung by scorpions. The sting can cause pain, and inflammation, which can cause redness, swelling, and itchiness at the site. That’s potentially why your dog is so anxious to lick the wound.

Possible signs of scorpion stings in dogs:
  • Yelping

  • Jumping back

  • Limping

  • Licking or pawing at the site

  • Tremors

  • Restlessness

While there are about 100 species in the United States, the main one of medical significance is the Arizona Bark Scorpion (Centruroides sculpturatus). It lives in the American Southwest and is of particular concern in the state that gives it its name. The venom can cause excess stimulation of the nervous system, leading to changes in heart rate, blood pressure, twitching and drooling.

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Treatment of Scorpion Stings

Treatment for scorpion stings is primarily supportive. Your vet may sedate your dog if your pet is agitated, and deal with the sting site, as necessary. Follow-up includes pain medications to keep your pup comfortable. Your vet will also treat other signs, such as administering fluids if your dog has been vomiting or experiencing GI distress.

Close monitoring of your dog is necessary since the effects can persist. While an antivenom exists, it may not be readily available; further, it is most effective only when administered right after the sting; it may not be efficacious after the fact.

cocker spaniel dog vet
Image Credit: Goldfish Studio, Shutterstock

Preventing Scorpion Stings

Of course, you must always be on guard if you live where scorpions dwell, especially at night when they’re active. Anything that was outdoors needs to be checked before bringing it inside your home. That includes wood for a fire pit, as woodpiles provide ideal hiding places for these pests.

It’s tougher if you’re not used to this kind of vigilance as a visitor to the American Southwest. You can follow many of the precautions for preventing ticks from getting in your house. Another clever trick is to inspect your home using a UV light. The shells of scorpions glow in the dark when you shine a black light on them. It’s a quick way to ensure things are safe without any nasty surprises lurking.

We recommend supervising your dog when outside in the yard. Often, pets will sniff around, exploring their world without regard to the threats that may exist. If your pup is a digger, we suggest discouraging this unwanted behavior, as you may never know what your pooch may unearth.

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Final Thoughts

Treating a scorpion sting promptly is imperative. These wounds are painful and dangerous if your dog has a strong reaction. Care is mainly supportive, with managing pain being a top priority. Some issues may persist, warranting close monitoring of your pet as they recover. Fortunately, these encounters are rarely fatal. Nevertheless, prevention is necessary if you live in a place that scorpions call home.


Featured Image Credit: Rob Hainer, Shutterstock

The post My Dog Was Stung by a Scorpion, What Should I Do? Vet Approved Advice appeared first on Pet Keen.