13 Surprising Australian Pet Spending Statistics to Know In 2023

Note: This article’s statistics come from third-party sources and do not represent the opinions of this website.

For many people, pets are part of the family. They need plenty of attention, lots of care, and need to be provided for. From the cost of buying the pet, in the first place, to ongoing food costs and vet visits, the cost of owning any type of pet can add up to reach a surprisingly high amount.

In fact, it is estimated that a dog will cost its owner a total of $25,000 over its lifetime, although the actual figure can be higher or lower than this. This means that the $2,000 paid to buy a dog, in the first place, represents a fraction of the total lifetime cost.

Food is the biggest pet expenditure, accounting for about half of what we spend on our animals each year, with vet costs and vet services the next biggest outlay. Because of the large increase in pet ownership figures during the COVID-19 pandemic, Australia spent more than $33 billion on their pets in 2022 alone.

Below are 13 surprising Australian pet spending statistics, including figures on total expenditure and details on where that money goes.

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13 Surprising Australian Pet Spending Statistics

  1. There are approximately 27 million pets nationwide.
  2. 69% of Australian households now own at least one pet.
  3. Nearly half of Australian households own a dog.
  4. There are more pet fish than any other animal, but dogs and cats have seen the biggest increases.
  5. Australians spent over $33 billion on their pets in 2022.
  6. Pet food was the biggest expenditure, followed by vet services and then pet products and accessories.
  7. 89% of pet expenditure is spent on dogs and cats.
  8. Generation Z spends the most per vet visit, while Baby Boomers spend the least.
  9. The cost of buying a dog or cat has doubled since before the pandemic.
  10. Dog owners spend an average of $3,218 a year on their pets.
  11. Cat owners spend an average of $1,715 a year on their pets.
  12. Only 17% of dog owners and 12% of cat owners have pet insurance.
  13. A dog will cost its owner approximately $25,000 over its lifetime.

divider-multiprintPet Ownership in Australia

1. There are approximately 29 million pets nationwide.

(PFIAA)

Australia really is a nation of pet lovers. In 2022, following a big increase in pet ownership as a result of owners having more free time and extra time at home, there were 29 million pets across the country. This included 6.5 million dogs and 5.5 million cats, but these figures were dwarfed by the 11 million fish.

cat and dachshund dog on a rug
Image Credit: Africa Studio, Shutterstock

2. 69% of Australian households now own at least one pet.

(Pet Food Industry)

A staggering 69% of households across Australia own at least one pet of one sort or another, including cats, dogs, and fish. While there are many more fish, this is because the average fish owner keeps more fish than the average dog owner keeps dogs. Only 12% of households keep fish.


3. Nearly half of Australian households own a dog.

(Statista 1)

While 12% of households keep fish, 48% keep dogs, which is an increase from the 40% that kept dogs in 2019. 33% of households kept cats, which was also an increase from 2019, up from 27%. Other popular animals include birds, which were kept by 11% of households and just behind fish. 4% of households kept small mammals, and 1% kept other pets.

Asian woman owner grooming hair dryer to dry Cockapoo dog hair in house
Image Credit: MT.PHOTOSTOCK, Shutterstock

4. There are more pet fish than any other animal, but dogs and cats have seen the biggest increases.

(Statista 2)

While there are almost as many pet fish as dogs and cats combined, it was canine and feline companions that saw the greatest increase in ownership during the pandemic. In 2019, there were 5.1 million dogs compared to 6.3 million dogs in 2021. Cat numbers increased from 3.77 million to 4.9 million in the same period. Fish numbers actually decreased in this time, down from 11.33 million to 11.19 million.

divider-multiprintGeneral Pet Expenditure

5. Australians spent over $33 billion on their pets in 2022.

(Pet Food Industry)

As pet lovers, Australians spend a lot of money on their animals. In total, the nation spent over $33 billion on pet food, vet services, pet accessories, and healthcare products.

Shih tzu dog getting food from owner at kitchen
Image Credit: chaoss, Shutterstock

6. Pet food was the biggest expenditure, followed by vet services and then pet products and accessories.

(Pet Food Industry)

Of the $33 billion spent, 51% was spent on pet food, with 14% on vet services, 9% on accessories, and a further 9% on healthcare products. The remaining 17% was spent on insurance, alternative therapy sessions, and pet grooming services. When buying pet food, owners first consider what type of food their pet likes to eat and then the price. Almost a third of owners said that they prepare or cook treats or food for their pets, themselves.


7. 89% of pet expenditure is spent on dogs and cats.

(PFIAA)

The vast majority, or 89%, of all pet expenditure was spent on cats and dogs. Food for dogs and cats is typically more expensive than food for fish and birds, and owners spend more on treats as well as vet and insurance services, hence the larger outlay.

a couple with pet signing insurance contract
Image Credit: Drazen Zigic, Shutterstock

divider-multiprintPet Spend Specifics

8. Generation Z spends the most per vet visit, while Baby Boomers spend the least.

(Statista 3)

Generation Z are those that were born between the 1990s and the 2010s, and they are the generation that spends the most, per visit, on their pets. Generation Z owners spent an average of $630 per vet visit, while at the other end of the scale, Baby Boomers spent an average of $548 per visit.


9. The cost of buying a dog or cat has doubled since before the pandemic.

(PFIAA)

The pandemic saw many more people working from home and not having to go out to work. Lockdowns also meant people were unable to see friends and family, with pets being an even greater source of companionship during the Covid years. As a result, more people bought dogs and cats to keep them company, and with this increase in demand came an increase in cost. More than a third of new dogs now cost more than $2,000, compared to just 16% before the pandemic. More than 1 in 10 cats now cost more than $1,000, and prices have been reported to have doubled during this period.

well behaved dog looking at his owner while sleeping
Image Credit: Igor Normann, Shutterstock

10. Dog owners spend an average of $3,218 a year on their pets.

(RSPCA)

Dogs eat more, have high vet bills, and generally require more expensive toys and accessories than any other type of pet. As a result of this, they have the highest annual expenditure of any pet type and cost an average of $3,218 a year per dog, including all costs and fees.


11. Cat owners spend an average of $1,715 a year on their pets.

(RSPCA)

Cats do still require high-quality food, and they should be given toys and accessories to ensure they are physically and mentally fulfilled and happy. While the cost of keeping a cat is lower than keeping a dog, it still costs an average of $1,715 a year to keep a cat.

woman owner petting and playing with her cat at home
Image Credit: Stokkete, Shutterstock

12. Only 17% of dog owners and 12% of cat owners have pet insurance.

(RSPCA)

Despite vet bills and services being the second highest category of goods and services pet owners spend their money on, the majority of owners do not have insurance for their pets. In fact, 17% of households with a dog and just 12% of households with a cat say that they have pet insurance. The main reasons given for not having pet insurance are that policies cost too much and that they do not represent good value for money.


13. A dog will cost its owner approximately $25,000 over its lifetime.

(Real Insurance)

When taking into account all costs, including the cost of purchase, vet bills, food, and accessories, it is estimated that a dog will cost its owner $25,000 over its entire lifetime. This fee can be higher if a dog has illnesses or even if it is a large breed that requires more food.

an obedient poodle toy dog sits on the grass looking at the owner
Image Credit: Linas T, Shutterstock

divider-multiprintFrequently Asked Questions About Pet Spending

Is pet insurance worth it?

Depending on the type of policy and the extent of its coverage, pet insurance can cover unexpected illnesses and injuries as a result of accidents. The policy will pay for vet treatment and may cover expenses such as medication and, in some cases, alternative therapies. Some treatments can cost several thousand dollars or more, and without pet insurance, owners have to pay all of these fees themselves. With pet insurance, the insurer will usually pay the majority, so pet insurance gives owners the peace of mind that they won’t have to worry about the financial aspects of treatment for their pets. Hopefully, you will never need to call on your pet insurance policy. If you do need to, it can make a difficult time easier.

elderly border collie dog in spectacles considers buying pet insurance
Image Credit: Pixsooz, Shutterstock

What is the most common pet in Australia?

The most common pet in Australia, by the total animal population, is the fish. There are more than 11 million pet fish. However, in terms of the number of household owners, the dog is the most popular pet because 48% of households own at least one dog.


How can you save money on pet spending?

There are various ways to save money on pet spend without sacrificing the care you provide your pet. Buy and stock up on food when it is on offer, and consider making your own homemade, healthy, affordable treats instead of buying expensive commercial products. Look at wellness and preventive care programs to see whether they can save you money on treatments like deworming and flea products. If you have insurance, shop around to ensure you get the best deal and try to take advantage of multi-pet and other discounts to get even lower prices.

divider-multiprintConclusion

Pets can enrich and improve people’s lives, and their companionship was proven during Dovid lockdowns when many owners turned to their pets in lieu of being able to see family and friends outside their own households. However, pets—whether they are small mammals or horses and farm livestock—do cost money to keep. Australians spent more than $33 billion on their pets last year, with the majority going on food but a decent portion being spent on vet services and pet products and accessories. Dogs cost nearly twice as much as cats over their respective lifetimes, but all animals do have a cost.


Featured Image Credit: Priscilla Du Preez, Unsplash

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10 Disheartening Australia Animal Homelessness Statistics to Know in 2023

Like most countries, Australia has a serious problem with animal homelessness. Many parts of the country have far more pets than people can reasonably take care of. Furthermore, with the cost of living rising, many owners have had to give up their pets to make ends meet. According to many statistics, the Australian animal homeless crisis is getting worse—not better.

Several statistics about Australia’s pet homeless crisis may surprise you. Let’s take a look at some of the more surprising ones.

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The 10 Australia Animal Home Statistics

  1. The RSPCA received 94,828 animals in the 2021–2022 fiscal year.
  2. Most of these animals are cats, though the “other” category is the highest.
  3. Municipal councils receive the largest intake of stray and surrendered animals (54%), with the RSPCA as the second largest organization (35%).
  4. Out of those received by the municipal courts, almost half are reclaimed. However, that statistic is much lower with the RSPCA.
  5. Australia investigated 53,680 animal cruelty cases in the 2021–2022 fiscal year. However, there were only 318 prosecutions.
  6. Far more dogs are successfully rehomed than cats.
  7. About 12.9% of dogs are euthanized.
  8. On the other hand, about 18.3% of cats are euthanized.
  9. The number of pets euthanized is steadily dropping, by most statistics. (PubMed)
  10. Dogs were most likely to be euthanized for behavioral problems, while cats were more likely to be euthanized for medical reasons.
homeless dogs of different breeds in animal shelter
Image Credit: Evgeny Bakhchev, Shutterstock

divider-multiprintNational Statistics

1. The RSPCA received 94,828 animals in the 2021–2022 fiscal year.

(RSPCA National Statistics)

These animals include a large number of cats and dogs, as you would guess. However, wild animals are often presented to the RSPCA due to being injured or orphaned. Some of their facilities can treat wildlife animals and rehabilitate them. Many of these animals are released live.

Several animals that are received are reclaimed or rehomed. Far more dogs are reclaimed than animals belonging to other categories. Cats are the least likely to be reclaimed after becoming lost.


2. Most of these animals are cats, though the “other” category is the highest.

(RSPCA National Statistics)

About twice as many cats are received than dogs. However, the “other” category is the highest, at least for the RSPCA. Other animals include small animals, horses, livestock, and wildlife. Most of these usually require treatment and rehabilitation. Therefore, while the RSPCA is often seen as a pet rescue organization, the truth is that they rescue a wide variety of animals.

four kittens in a cage in an animal shelter
Image Credit: Tom Feist, Shutterstock

3. Municipal councils receive the largest intake of stray and surrendered animals (54%), with the RSPCA as the second largest organization (35%).

(PubMed)

While the RSPCA is the most prolific, municipal councils receive far more stray and surrendered animals. Many of these animals are reclaimed—more so than those received by the RSPCA. However, this is likely due to the types of animals received. Local councils are far more likely to receive stray animals, while the RSPCA may be more likely to receive surrendered animals.

Still, municipal councils deal with most homeless animals in Australia.

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Outcome Statistics

4. Out of those received by the municipal courts, almost half are reclaimed. However, that statistic is much lower with the RSPCA.

(PubMed)

As we’ve stated, the animals received by the municipal courts are much more likely to be reclaimed than in other facilities. Most of the animals they receive are lost, and their owners are likely looking for them. However, the RSPCA handles a lot of wildlife and surrendered animals.

Both organizations are essential for homeless animals in Australia, and they handle the majority of these animals together.


5. Australia investigated 53,680 animal cruelty cases in the 2021-2022 fiscal year. However, there were only 318 prosecutions.

(RSPCA National Statistics)

There are many cases of animal cruelty investigated each year in Australia. However, the vast majority of these do not involve charges. Likely, this is because many owners can change their ways before they are prosecuted. Most cases of animal cruelty involve neglect, which can sometimes be corrected through education.

However, there are a few hundred prosecutions each year. The animals involved in these cases are often taken from their owners.


6. Far more dogs are successfully rehomed than cats.

(RSPCA Report on Outcomes)

Reuniting the animal with its owner or rehoming the animal tends to be the biggest goal in handling animal homelessness. However, far more dogs are successfully rehomed than cats. Furthermore, dogs are far more likely to be reclaimed after coming in as strays.

This leaves many cats with uncertain futures. Usually, cats stay in shelters much longer and may move through multiple agencies because they are rehomed. Plus, cats are more likely to live on the street as strays longer. Therefore, the period of a cat’s life where the animal is homeless tends to be much longer than for dogs.

At any one point, there are over twice as many homeless cats as dogs.

homeless cat eating outside
Image Credit: Smeilov Sergey, Shutterstock

divider-multiprintEuthanasia Statistics

7. About 12.9% of dogs are euthanized.

(RSPCA Report on Outcomes)

Sadly, about 12.9% of all dogs received are euthanized each year. There are quite a few reasons why this may occur. Luckily, many more dogs are reclaimed or rehomed than those euthanized. Most dogs entering the system get rehomed or find a new home, but there is a large percentage of them that do not.


8. On the other hand, about 18.3% of cats are euthanized.

(RSPCA Report on Outcomes)

Only slightly more cats get euthanized than dogs. This is quite surprising, considering how many more cats end up homeless than dogs. Furthermore, a lower percentage of cats find homes, whether that is via rehoming or getting reclaimed. Fewer cats get reclaimed than dogs when they end up as strays, though the reason for this isn’t exactly known.

The vast majority (60%) of cats get rehomed. Only 6% get returned to their previous owner, either after a seizure or due to the cat becoming lost. There are far more cats needing a home than dogs. More cats end up in the system, and very few get returned to their owners.


9. The number of pets euthanized is steadily dropping, by most statistics.

(PubMed)

Luckily, practically every statistic shows far fewer euthanized animals as the years go on. It doesn’t matter whether you look at nationwide statistics, those released by the RSPCA, or species-specific statistics. Euthanizing rates are decreasing in all categories.

However, rates in dogs have remained pretty steady over the last few years. This is likely because many dogs are euthanized for unpreventable reasons, like behavioral problems. A small percentage of dogs will have behavioral issues, and there isn’t much you can do to fix that.

On the other hand, feline euthanizations have decreased substantially. In 2002, over half of all cats taken in by the RSPCA were euthanized. Today, that number is closer to 18%. For the most part, this is due to increased adoptions.


10. Dogs were most likely to be euthanized for behavioral problems, while cats were more likely to be euthanized for medical reasons.

(RSPCA Report on Outcomes)

Most dogs are euthanized for behavioral reasons. Often, this involves aggression or severe anxiety. The RSPCA may try and treat problems with behavioral therapy. However, dogs that don’t show improvement are euthanized. These dogs are considered unsafe to rehome, as they are likely to cause injury to their new owners.

On the other hand, cats are more likely to be euthanized for health reasons. Feline leukemia is a common health problem that cats are euthanized for. This chronic, uncurable disease kills cats within 2 to 3 years. Many cats do not show symptoms until later, but they remain contagious. Therefore, many seemingly healthy cats are brought in, test positive for feline leukemia, and then must be euthanized.

Cats are also euthanized for behavioral problems. Usually, this relates to anxiety. However, cats are less likely to be euthanized for behavioral issues than dogs, as they are less likely to be dangerously aggressive. After all, cats are relatively small.

two women at an animal shelter
Image Credit: hedgehog94, Shutterstock

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Frequently Asked Questions About Australian Animal Homelessness

Why Are More Australians Giving Up Their Pets?

There has recently been an increase in pet surrenders in Australia. Part of this is due to the reduction in Covid restrictions. Now that people are returning to work, they may no longer have the time to take care of the pets they adopted in 2020.

Furthermore, all pets have a “teen” stage, where they are more likely to exhibit pet problems. This fact isn’t well-known, so many people believe that their well-behaved kitten has suddenly become not so well-behaved. Pets adopted during Covid are reaching this threshold, leading to more surrenders.

However, financial pressures play another role. The economy is currently in poor shape, leaving many people in desperate situations.

Is Australia a Pet-Friendly Country?

There are many pet-friendly spaces in Australia. However, Australia has more regulations and laws revolving around personal life, and pet regulations are particularly strict. For instance, the vaccination schedule is much more stringent in Australia, and many areas have bans on specific breeds. The country also has stricter biosecurity regulations, controlling which pets can be brought into the country. The country has even planned to kill 2 million cats through “toxic grooming devices,” shooting, poisoning, and similar means.

Why Are Pets Not Allowed in Australia?

Many types of pets are banned in Australia. For instance, several dog breeds are not allowed, often due to safety concerns. However, no study has yet to find that “aggressive” breeds are more aggressive, and Australia has similar dog bite statistics as other countries.

Furthermore, all pets from “approved” breeds must meet specific licensing and vaccination regulations. It is much harder to own pets in Australia than in other countries.

dog in shelter
Image Credit: jwvein, Pixabay

Why Aren’t Hamsters Allowed in Australia?

Hamsters, gerbils, and similar animals are illegal in Australia. That is due to their potential risk to the environment. You cannot import these hamsters; owning them is restricted chiefly to scientific research. Research shows these animals can set up colonies around urban areas and potentially become pests.

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Conclusion

Australia has a homeless pet problem, just like every other country. Despite their strict regulations on pet breeding and sterilization surgeries, there are tons of pets looking for homes. In fact, these policies have yet to affect the number of pets looking for a home.

The cat population in Australia is particularly troubled. More cats are euthanized than any other animal, and many more felines are looking for homes. With that said, there are several dogs euthanized, as well. Luckily, most euthanizations these days are due to behavioral or medical problems that make the pet unable to be adopted.

Sources

Featured Image Credit: Africa Studio, Shutterstock

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12 Surprising Canada Veterinarian Statistics to Know In 2023

Note: This article’s statistics come from third-party sources and do not represent the opinions of this website.

Have you ever wondered how pet healthcare works in Canada? A routine exam is more expensive than in the neighboring United States. Overall, Canadian veterinarians do have higher salaries, but also tend to start their careers with a larger pile of debt. Plus, there are only 5 accredited veterinary colleges in Canada and Canadians must attend university in the province where they live. All of these factors contribute to very few people actually becoming veterinarians.

It’s projected that there will soon be a shortage of veterinarians in Canada due to burnout over long hours and job functions that are as demanding emotionally as they are physically. Here’s a peek at a few veterinary stats in Canada in case you’re curious, or if you’re considering moving there as a pet owner or prospective future animal doctor.

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Top 12 Canada Veterinarian Statistics

  1. A routine wellness visit costs between $80 and $120 in Canada.
  2. There are approximately 15,322 practicing veterinarians in Canada.
  3. The majority of Canadian veterinarians are female (62%).
  4. 5,383 veterinarians work in Ontario alone.
  5. In all of Canada, there are an estimated 3,825 veterinary offices.
  6. An estimated 432,533 dogs and cats have a pet insurance policy.
  7. 9% of the cat and dog population in Ontario have a pet insurance policy.
  8. The Canada Veterinary Healthcare Systems Market is expected to grow 7.25% by 2028.
  9. There are only 5 accredited veterinary colleges in all of Canada.
  10. Approximately 450 veterinary college students graduate each year.
  11. Tuition costs between $4,400-$12,717 per semester depending on the school.
  12. Canadian veterinarians earn around $95,000-$145,000 per year.

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Veterinarians by the Numbers

1. A routine wellness visit costs between $80 and $120 in Canada.

(Rover, Lemonade)

Compared to $45-$55 in the United States, a wellness visit in Canada is nearly double the price. What’s more, this estimate is basically just the exam fee to see the vet and doesn’t include additional medicines or procedures. Sick visits and emergency clinics cost even more than that.

a veterinarian holding a white dog
Image Credit: Viktor Gladkov, Shutterstock

2. There are approximately 15,322 practicing veterinarians in Canada.

(Canadian Veterinary Medical Association, Zippia)

This isn’t an extremely low number, considering there are only 47,693 practicing veterinarians in the United States. Since there are almost 10 times the number of people living in America compared to Canada, there are substantially more veterinarians per capita in Canada.


3. The majority of Canadian veterinarians are female (62%).

(Canadian Veterinary Medical Association)

Only 32% of Canadian veterinarians are male. Interestingly, these statistics mirror the demographics in the US. For some reason, women seem to be drawn to the calling much more frequently than men.


4. 5,383 veterinarians work in Ontario alone.

(Canadian Veterinary Medical Association, Living in Canada)

Ontario has the largest number of veterinarians in any of the provinces. Quebec has the second most, with 2,851 doctors operating in the area. Interestingly, veterinarians tend to make the most money in Alberta.

veterinarian and two volunteer
Image Credit: Mikhail Nilov, Pexels

5. In all of Canada, there are an estimated 3,825 veterinary offices.

(Canada Veterinary Medical Association)

Statistically, this means that every practice has an average of 4-5 veterinarians on staff. Of course, that’s not always accurate, though, since offices are different sizes.

divider-multiprintExpected Growth

6. An estimated 432,533 Canadian dogs and cats have a pet insurance policy.

(Mordor Intelligence)

Between 2020 and 2021, the number of pet insurance policies increased by 22.7%. Since pet insurance allows for more frequent visits to the vet without paying the total cost, it’s theorized that the demand for veterinarians will increase accordingly.


7. 38.9% of the cat and dog population in Ontario have a pet insurance policy.

(Mordor Intelligence)

While 38.9% is an impressive percentage, it’s not too surprising since Ontario has the largest number of veterinarians. The more people that enroll their pets in insurance policies, the more we expect to see veterinary visits rise.

bernese mountain dog and cat lying on the floor
Image Credit: Louis-Philippe Poitras, Unsplash

8. The Canada Veterinary Healthcare Systems Market is expected to grow 7.25% by 2028.

(Mordor Intelligence)

While the rise in pet ownership is a good thing, the fast growth rate could perpetuate the burnout problem that Canadian veterinarians already have been experiencing. If the trend progresses in the current direction, there will be a veterinarian shortage of 15,000 by 2030, which is almost the total number practicing today.

divider-multiprintStatistics on Veterinary College

9. There are only 5 accredited veterinary colleges in all of Canada

(CBC National News)

Additionally, Canadians can’t choose which veterinary college they attend. They must enroll at the one located in their province. Admission requirements include 2 years education of pre-veterinary courses at a standard university. Veterinary school in Canada takes between 4-6 years to complete, for a total of about 8 years of higher education.


10. Approximately 450 veterinary college students graduate each year.

(CBC National News, Canadian Veterinary Medical Association)

Of this number, only about 380 are Canadian citizens. The remainder are international students who may or may not linger. For example, it’s common for an American to attend a Canadian veterinary school, receive their degree, and go back to the United States to start their practice. However, not all universities are accredited for international practice so it depends on the school.

vet. student studying animal skeleton
Image Credit: Elnur, Shutterstock

11. Tuition costs between $4,400-$12,717 per semester.

(CBC National News)

The University of Saskatchewan has the highest tuition, while the Université de Montréal was the least expensive.


12. Canadian veterinarians earn around $95,000-$145,000 per year.

(Indeed Canada)

While this number sounds appealing, most veterinarians begin their careers in deep debt. Even a six-figure salary isn’t very much considering that veterinary college costs between $340,000-$360,000 and that doesn’t include the two years of preliminary veterinary courses at their local university.

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Frequently Asked Questions About Veterinarians in Canada

1. How long does it take to become a veterinarian in Canada?

After high school, you must take 2 years of pre-veterinary courses at a standard university and then transfer to veterinary college. There are only 5 veterinary colleges in Canada, and the acceptance rate is rather low. Once you’ve completed the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Program, you must pass the North American Veterinary Licensing Examination (NAVLE) before applying for a provincial licensing. The entire process, from pre-veterinary courses to licensing, takes roughly 6-8 years.

(Indeed Canada)

Vet teacher explaining anatomy to students
Image Credit: Elnur, Shutterstock

2. Do veterinarians make more money in Canada?

A veterinarian’s actual salary depends on their province and individual clinic, as well as their education status and experience. The normal salary range is between $95,000 and $145,000 per year, compared with a median salary of $100,370 in the US. However, tuition is also much higher in Canada, which means that most veterinarians are swimming in debt for years after they start their careers.

(Indeed Canada, Money)


3. Will the demand for veterinarians continue to grow?

As in most western countries, pet ownership skyrocketed in Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic. While veterinarians are certainly happy that so many animals found a home, the rapid rise of pet parenting has led to a veterinarian shortage that’s projected to get worse as we edge towards 2030. Hopefully, there will be more incentives in the near future to address the problem, especially since veterinary college tuition remains high and acceptance rates stay low.

(Mordor Intelligence)

group of students chatting
Image Credit: Ivan Samkov, Pexels

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Conclusion

Veterinary costs and salaries are much higher in Canada than they are in the United States. Although the process of becoming a vet is similar in both countries, veterinary college is much more limited and expensive in Canada. As people acquire more pets and pet insurance policies, the demand for more veterinarians is expected to grow.


Featured Image Credit: hedgehog94_Shutterstock

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